The Quiet Port is Logistics’ Nightmare

This is really turning out to be a great story. I can’t wait to see more pictures. It really helps put things in perspective, especially time wise.

The Disorder Of Things

Dispatch #2 from Charmaine’s ethnography of a container ship comes to us from the port of Tacoma, where the ship is currently experiencing severe delays. Continue to follow the Ever Cthulhu with the tag ‘Slow Boat to China’.


Source: author Source: author

It is 3am on a Wednesday when we pick up the Port Angeles pilot who will take the ship through the Puget Sound. All day, we have been sailing through a fog that has hung so thickly around the ship that it has seemed we are drifting through clouds. The fog has delayed our pilot by four hours: sailing through the Puget Sound’s narrow channel is already a formidable task, made Herculean by the fact that no one can see past the ship’s nose. Take that, multiply it by the fact that the port of Tacoma is situated in a tight bottleneck of an inlet, that an unusual volume of vessels…

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Budd & Leni

Longreads

Bruce Handy | Tin House | March 2013 | 26 minutes (6,452 words)

They were fleeting and unlikely collaborators, for lack of a better word. He was a son of Jewish Hollywood royalty, she a Nazi fellow traveler and propagandist, though they had a few things in common, too: both were talented filmmakers, both produced enduring work, and both would spend the second halves of their lives explaining or denying past moral compromises. Which isn’t to say the debits on their ledgers were equal—far from it.

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Carl Zeiss Distagon T* 1.4/35 ZM sample Images in Paris

Such a nice lens. Such nice photos.

Cemal Sagnak

Here some sample shots from Paris of the new Carl Zeiss Distagon T* 1.4/35 ZM made with the Leica M 240.

The pictures are modified and reworked in Photoshop and Lightroom. Generally the Lens has no Distortion and very little vignette thefore there is no official recommendation for using the 6bit Code. I shot most of my pictures with the 6bit Code of the 35mm Summilux asph.

According to Carl  Zeiss the lens will be shipped in the first week of January

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Grey days

Everyday is grey

Grey cement buildings; grey skies

Grey wind blows grey dust

It is raining again. The big toothed girl from the advertisement stares down on me lovingly while I ride the train.
I want to punch her.
It’s raining. No one should be that happy.
I am unswayed by her attempts to make me buy her product, whatever it may be.

The train lurches along the wet track. Falling drops of water explode as they collide with the train. Salarymans and OLs play with their keitai, unaware, uncaring.

Buddy Holly muzak echoes through the bathroom in a steady stream.

My suit needs to be dry cleaned.

Everyday, more and more lights go up. Illumination. Winter is coming!

The Slow Boat to China

An interesting article about how container ships and the people on board work and live.

The Disorder Of Things

The following post is the first in a series of oceanic dispatches from Disorder member Charmaine Chua. She is currently on a 36-day journey on board a 100,000 ton Evergreen container ship starting in Los Angeles, going across the Pacific Ocean and ending in Taipei. Follow her ethnographic adventures with the tag ‘Slow Boat to China’.


“In civilizations without boats, dreams dry up, espionage takes the place of adventure, and the police take the place of pirates.”

– Foucault, Of Other Spaces

cc_EPL2_IMG_0666 Source: Author

There is uncanny beauty in the monstrous. This, at least, is the feeling that seizes me as I stand under the colossal Ever Cthulhu[1] berthed in the Port of Los Angeles. The ship’s hull alone rises eight stories into the air; even from a distance, I am unable to capture its full length or height within a single camera frame. In describing the…

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